• Extended Cut: Cannabis with Dr. Brandy Phipps

    Extended Cut: Cannabis with Dr. Brandy Phipps
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  • The Cannabis Industry Consumes Over 1% Of Total U.S. Electricity

    The Cannabis Industry Consumes Over 1% Of Total U.S. Electricity

    0

    Which of these is actually a strain of weed?


    Outdoor cannabis cultivation can have several environmental benefits, from sequestering carbon to remediating polluted soil. But most U.S. cannabis is grown inside greenhouses with sophisticated climate-control systems and high-powered lights that require a lot of energy — over 1% of total U.S. electricity use. Seeing as cannabis is projected to have a $70 billion market by 2028, this energy issue has the potential to get a lot worse if left unchecked. Today, we discuss how cannabis cultivation affects the environment, the links between cannabis and climate change, and how policymakers could help steer the industry’s environmental, economic, and social impacts in the right direction. With special guest Dr. Brandy Phipps: Research Assistant Professor of Food, Nutrition and Health at Central State University.

    The Sweaty Penguin is presented by Peril and Promise: a public media initiative from The WNET Group in New York, reporting on the issues and solutions around climate change. You can learn more at pbs.org/perilandpromise.

    Support the show and unlock exclusive merch, bonus content, and more for as little as $5/month at patreon.com/thesweatypenguin.

    CREDITS

    Writers: Olivia Amitay, Maddy Schmidt, Ethan Brown

    Fact Checker: Isabel Plower

    Editor: Frank Hernandez

    Producers: Olivia Amitay, Ethan Brown, Megan Crimmins, Shannon Damiano, Frank Hernandez, Dain Kim, Caroline Koehl

    Ad Voiceover: Lindsay Cronin

    Music: Brett Sawka

    The opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the host and guests. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of Peril and Promise or The WNET Group.

  • Annual Average Temperatures Aren’t the Best Climate Change Indicator

    Annual Average Temperatures Aren’t the Best Climate Change Indicator

    0

    Which is your favorite?


    Last week, the World Meteorological Organization issued a report stating that there is a 50:50 chance that at some point in the next five years, the global annual temperature could spike past 1.5°C hotter than preindustrial times. The goal that nearly every country in the world has agreed upon is to keep global warming under a threshold of 1.5°C by 2100, making the possibility of breaching it in the next five years particularly noteworthy. However, there is an important distinction: a blip over 1.5°C in a single year does not mean the world failed its climate goal. Ethan explains why year-to-year average temperatures are not the measuring stick for climate change and how the WMO’s report successfully explained that nuance in this week’s “Tip of the Iceberg.”

    The Sweaty Penguin is presented by Peril and Promise: a public media initiative from The WNET Group in New York, reporting on the issues and solutions around climate change. You can learn more at pbs.org/perilandpromise.

    Support the show and unlock exclusive merch, bonus content, and more for as little as $5/month at patreon.com/thesweatypenguin.

    CREDITS

    Writers: Ethan Brown, Shannon Damiano, Maddy Schmidt

    Fact Checker: Hallie Cordingley

    Editor: Frank Hernandez

    Producers: Olivia Amitay, Ethan Brown, Megan Crimmins, Shannon Damiano, Frank Hernandez, Dain Kim, Caroline Koehl

    Ad Voiceover: Lindsay Cronin

    Music: Brett Sawka

    The opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the host and guests. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of Peril and Promise or The WNET Group.

  • What Is Sustainable Housing and How Do We Achieve It?

    What Is Sustainable Housing and How Do We Achieve It?

    0

    What kind of home do you live in?


    For many people, sustainable housing brings to mind either show heads and toilets with zero water pressure or futuristic buildings that look like a spaceship. In reality, sustainable houses can actually look quite normal, and achieve carbon emission cuts, water conservation, and long-term cost savings. But what will it take to make millions of houses sustainable? Today, we explore what sustainable housing could look like, what stands in the way of making it happen, and how any of those hurdles could be overcome. With special guest Dr. Andréanne Doyon: Assistant Professor of Resource and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University.

    The Sweaty Penguin is presented by Peril and Promise: a public media initiative from The WNET Group in New York, reporting on the issues and solutions around climate change. You can learn more at pbs.org/perilandpromise.

    Support the show and unlock exclusive merch, bonus content, and more for as little as $5/month at patreon.com/thesweatypenguin.

    CREDITS

    Writers: Hallie Cordingley, Shannon Damiano, Ethan Brown

    Fact Checker: Megan Crimmins

    Editor: Frank Hernandez

    Producers: Olivia Amitay, Ethan Brown, Megan Crimmins, Shannon Damiano, Frank Hernandez, Dain Kim, Caroline Koehl

    Ad Voiceover: Lindsay Cronin

    Music: Brett Sawka

    The opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the host and guests. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of Peril and Promise or The WNET Group.


    Clips

  • Tip of the Iceberg E14: Climate Change Is Linked to Sexual and Reproductive Health

    Tip of the Iceberg E14: Climate Change Is Linked to Sexual and Reproductive Health


    0

    What food should puffins pair with their herring?


    Last week, Politico published a leaked draft opinion in the Mississippi abortion case facing the Supreme Court, showing the majority of justices in favor of overturning Roe v. Wade’s precedent of a constitutional right to abortion. In the climate world specifically, this draft sparked many conversations about how sexual and reproductive health is, in fact, a climate issue. So what do these two seemingly unrelated topics have to do with each other? Ethan gives a very truncated summary of the links between climate change and sexual and reproductive health and shares some climate solutions that could help both issues in this week’s “Tip of the Iceberg.”

    The Sweaty Penguin is presented by Peril and Promise: a public media initiative from The WNET Group in New York, reporting on the issues and solutions around climate change. You can learn more at pbs.org/perilandpromise.

    Support the show and unlock exclusive merch, bonus content, and more for as little as $5/month at patreon.com/thesweatypenguin.

    CREDITS

    Writer: Ethan Brown, Shannon Damiano, Maddy Schmidt

    Fact Checker: Hallie Cordingley

    Editor: Frank Hernandez

    Producers: Olivia Amitay, Ethan Brown, Megan Crimmins, Shannon Damiano, Frank Hernandez, Dain Kim, Caroline Koehl

    Ad Voiceover: Lindsay Cronin

    Music: Brett Sawka

    The opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the host and guests. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of Peril and Promise or The WNET Group.

  • How Puerto Rico’s El Yunque National Forest Responded to Hurricane Maria

    How Puerto Rico’s El Yunque National Forest Responded to Hurricane Maria

    0

    Have you ever been to El Yunque National Forest?


    Located in northeastern Puerto Rico, El Yunque National Forest is the only tropical forest in the United States, the home to many rare species such as the critically endangered Puerto Rican parrot, and the source of 50% of the water supply for the San Juan metro area. It also is one of the most important destinations in the Caribbean for ecotourism, hosting one million visitors and contributing $5.5 billion to the Puerto Rican economy every year. But between more severe droughts and more extreme hurricanes such as Maria, the forest is undergoing several changes that could put many of these important ecosystem services at risk. Today, we explore the significance of El Yunque, what risks hurricanes and droughts pose to the forest and nearby communities, and how the forest and island can adapt for the future. With special guest Dr. Maria Uriarte: Professor of Biology at Columbia University.

    The Sweaty Penguin is presented by Peril and Promise: a public media initiative from The WNET Group in New York, reporting on the issues and solutions around climate change. You can learn more at pbs.org/perilandpromise.

    Support the show and unlock exclusive merch, bonus content, and more for as little as $5/month at patreon.com/thesweatypenguin.

    CREDITS

    Writers: Isabel Plower, Maddy Schmidt, Ethan Brown

    Fact Checker: Hallie Cordingley

    Editor: Frank Hernandez

    Producers: Olivia Amitay, Ethan Brown, Megan Crimmins, Shannon Damiano, Frank Hernandez, Dain Kim, Caroline Koehl

    Ad Voiceover: Shannon Damiano

    Music: Brett Sawka

    The opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the host and guests. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of Peril and Promise or The WNET Group.


    Clips

     

     

  • Ethan Brown, The Sweaty Penguin Podcast on Entelechy Leadership Stories

    Ethan Brown, The Sweaty Penguin Podcast on Entelechy Leadership Stories
  • Growing Up With Drought

    Growing Up With Drought

    According to drought.gov, 6.4 million people in Arizona are affected by drought; nine counties have USDA disaster designations; and 2022 has been the 11th driest season in 128 years. I live in Boston now, but I spent the first 18 years of my life in a small town in northern Arizona. Was I aware there was a drought going on in Arizona? Yes. Was it omnipresent in my daily life? Absolutely not. I can by no means speak for the entire state, but in my own home, there were no buckets under the sink to catch drips, and there was no particular guilt attached to taking the occasional extra-long shower. Now, however, looking back on these years, I can see that there were clear signs of this reality throughout my early life. 

    At some point during my childhood, my front lawn was converted from grass to rock; my backyard was converted to turf; and while we never kept a bucket under the sink for those extra drips, my parents did go through a phase where they put a bucket in my brother’s shower to make a point about water waste. Each of these measures was justified with “You should see our water bill.” But I never quite took it to the next step and wondered why the water bill was so high. The answer? Drought was increasing the cost of water in the state. 

    The subject of drought also came up during my family’s annual trips to Lake Powell. Arizona gets 36% of its water from the Colorado River. The river runs through seven states — Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming — and feeds two reservoirs: Lake Powell and Lake Meade. Growing up, I remember hearing my parents talk about the sinking water levels in Lake Powell each year, especially when compared to their younger days. Currently Lake Powell’s water level is at 24% of capacity, its lowest level since it was first filled in 1963. For the most part, this has to do with the Colorado River seeing its driest conditions in more than 1,200 years

    Because of this, the Bureau of Reclamation declared the first-ever Tier 1 shortage of the Colorado River last year, leading to a cut of more than 500,000 acre-feet of water from Arizona. A Tier 2a increase could be coming in the next year that would escalate this cut to 800,000 acre-feet. However, this cut may have little effect on the ordinary Arizona resident. Most of Arizona’s water usage is outdoors in yards, pools, plants, and lawns. Arizona water providers have not yet required the residential water reduction measures that have been implemented in parts of California. The passage of an initiative to store unused Colorado River water in underground aquifers makes it unlikely that Arizona homeowners will face harsh reality any time soon.  

    To be honest, I have heard more about the drought in Arizona during my four years on the East Coast than I ever did while living there. Of course, I was a child for most of that time and not necessarily aware of water issues in the state, but I do think it is telling. Drought is one of those climate change effects that is very slow at onset. It doesn’t look as dramatic as a devastating hurricane or a raging wildfire. It means converting your lawn to rocks one year, and temporary placement of a bucket under your son’s shower the next. This fact doesn’t change the severity and the peril of drought conditions in Arizona and other Western states. But it is important to look at drought through this lens when considering its day-to-day impact on people’s lives — and how it will affect their willingness to act on the issue.

  • Tip of the Iceberg E13: Is “emergency” the right word for SoCal’s water shortage?

    Tip of the Iceberg E13: Is “emergency” the right word for SoCal’s water shortage?


    1

    Do you feel there are ways, personally, you could be more water efficient?


    In an unprecedented move, Southern California officials declared a water shortage emergency last week and ordered outdoor water usage be restricted to just one day a week for about 6 million people in parts of Los Angeles, Ventura and San Bernardino counties. From a policy perspective, the move may make sense. But when climate change clearly shows water availability in Southern California is only going to get worse, is framing the problem as an “emergency” giving false hope of a future day where the water shortage is over? Ethan reflects on why it may be less overwhelming to acknowledge the tough reality and put more emphasis on strategic, collaborative, money-saving water conservation solutions in this week’s “Tip of the Iceberg.”

    The Sweaty Penguin is presented by Peril and Promise: a public media initiative from The WNET Group in New York, reporting on the issues and solutions around climate change. You can learn more at pbs.org/perilandpromise.

    Support the show and unlock exclusive merch, bonus content, and more for as little as $5/month at patreon.com/thesweatypenguin.

    CREDITS

    Writer: Ethan Brown, Shannon Damiano, Maddy Schmidt

    Fact Checker: Megan Crimmins

    Editor: Frank Hernandez

    Producers: Olivia Amitay, Ethan Brown, Megan Crimmins, Shannon Damiano, Frank Hernandez, Dain Kim, Caroline Koehl

    Ad Voiceover: Frank Hernandez

    Music: Brett Sawka

    The opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the host and guests. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of Peril and Promise or The WNET Group.

  • Quiz: Can You Find the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker?

    Quiz: Can You Find the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker?

    Though the U.S. government declared the ivory-billed woodpecker extinct in 2021, the bird isn’t going down without a fight. A team of researchers claim the elusive bird is still alive and pecking in the forests of Louisiana, though their research has yet to be peer-reviewed. So we need your help. Is the ivory-billed woodpecker really extinct, or can you help us find it?

    1. 1 It’s time to find the ivory-billed woodpecker. Are you ready?

      1. Yes.
      2. Let’s do it.
      3. …99! 100! Ready or not, here I come!
      4. DON’T DIE WOODPECKER I’LL FIND YOU!
    2. 2 Where do you look first?

      1. The forest
      2. The Grand Canyon
      3. The bathroom
      4. New York City
    3. 3 Alright, you’re here. What do you do?

      1. Retrace your footsteps
      2. Shout “Ka-Kaw! Ka-Kaw!”
      3. Climb up high for a better view
      4. Play it cool and let the woodpecker come to you
    4. 4 Nope, no luck yet. Want to try something else?

      1. Download Find My Woodpecker on your phone
      2. Put some wood on the floor that’s just begging to be pecked
      3. Ask if you can stop playing hide-and-seek and switch to man hunt so it’s quicker
      4. Keep doing what you were doing before, like an idiot
    5. 5 You’re about to give up when… wait, is that a sound? What is that sound?

      1. Cock-a-doodle doo!
      2. Ka-Kaw! Ka-Kaw!
      3. Aflac!
      4. A quiet nasal “toot”
    6. 6 You follow the sound and eventually, you notice something rustling. It’s…

      1. High up in a tree
      2. Far away on a lake
      3. Straddling a cable line
      4. Leaving an upper decker
    7. 7 You can’t get a good view so far away, so you try taking a picture to get a better view.

      1. Zoom in really far on your camera
      2. Hold your camera up to a pair of binoculars
      3. Buy a new sports lens, wait 7 business days for it to arrive, and use that
      4. Turn on the camera timer, then chuck the camera toward it so it snaps the picture automatically
    8. 8 Dammit, the picture is blurry. I guess there’s only one way to find out if it’s an ivory-billed woodpecker.

      1. Walk up to it
      2. Jump out and say “peek-a-boo!”
      3. Ask it nicely
      4. Hire a biologist on Craigslist

    Quiz: Can You Find the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker?

    Created on
    1. Quiz result

      You found the ivory-billed woodpecker!

      You did it! That’s the ivory-billed woodpecker! Submit your blurry picture to a peer-reviewed academic journal and collect your Nobel prize, because you just brought a famous bird species back from the dead. Congratulations! Now don’t let the fame get to you.

      Share Your Result
    2. Quiz result

      You idiot! That’s a duck!

      Are you a moron? If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, in no scenario is it an ivory-billed woodpecker. Go back to school, you half-baked dimwit.

      Share Your Result
    3. Quiz result

      Bad news, it was just a regular woodpecker. But sometimes it’s about the journey, not the destination.

      Think about it. You took a chance. You explored. You risked everything. None of that would have happened without the ivory-billed woodpecker. And sure, you didn’t find what you were hoping for, but what you did find was so much more valuable. Maybe the real ivory-billed woodpecker was inside you all along.

      Share Your Result
    4. Quiz result

      Oops, it was an electric toothbrush.

      Tough mistake, but it can happen to anyone. You wouldn’t expect an electric toothbrush to sound like a woodpecker, but in this case, that’s what happened. Is it disappointing? Yes. But it’s going to be okay. Take a year, reflect on what happened, and move onto bigger and better things. Searching for extinct woodpeckers might be more of a hobby than a job for you.

      Share Your Result
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